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Spider J

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Bob Abell30/11/2014 21:34:08
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8921 forum posts
2810 photos

Gareth.....I mean why horizontal.....Squeezing the drive mechanism down in the bilge water etc

When, with a 10 degree angle would cure the problem......Afterall....It's not a speedboat

Bob

Gareth Jones01/12/2014 08:12:18
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791 forum posts
1067 photos

Bob,

It was not difficult to mount the drive horizontal as the motor is only 35 mm in diameter.  Its just a triumph of simple functionality and design over style.  It's not that I am saying the Abell motor installation isn't well designed, just that its not well suited to a horizontal propshaft.

spider 14.jpg

Its a sealed prop shaft so there will not be any water leaking into the hull, although being sail powered and having relatively little freeboard (compared to Shemarah) I suppose I might get some washed in over the deck occasionally. However the hatches have quite large coamings and should be reasonably well sealed.

It might be a speedboat though, the motor is apparently capable of generating 717 watts in short bursts, that's nearly a horsepower, if I fitted the right propellor.

Gareth

Edited By Gareth Jones on 01/12/2014 08:20:06

Bob Abell01/12/2014 08:18:13
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8921 forum posts
2810 photos

Hello Gareth

I wonder....Is it worth fitting a watertight wall round the motor, since it's pretty low down?

Just an idea

Bob

Gareth Jones01/12/2014 08:22:59
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791 forum posts
1067 photos

It will be fine Bob, dont worry about it. Anyway it would probably run quite well under water, keep it cool when its belting out 700+watts.

Gareth

Dave Milbourn01/12/2014 09:30:46
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4011 forum posts
282 photos

Gareth

You might consider upgrading that U/J coupling. Those red things are good only for low RPM and there's no way it would take the best part of a brake horsepower. Many brushless installations use solid couplings or at least the metal variety favoured by powerboat enthusiasts. Have a shufti here, for example **LINK**

Dave M

Gareth Jones01/12/2014 10:30:05
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791 forum posts
1067 photos

Thanks for that Dave, I might try one of those. The red plastic couplings do have the advantage that you can slide the plastic sleeve off the splines on the brass insert, which can be quite usefull during the build when the motor has to go in and out repeatedly. Its not that high a speed drive anyway, only about 7000 rpm.

I am not seriously thinking of putting 700 watts through the motor, just seeing if its possabell to wind Bob up into thinking my model of a 90 year old barge might be faster than his quad engined cruiser. It might persuade him to try something with even more motors than Paul Thomason's tug for his next project.

Gareth

 

Edited By Gareth Jones on 01/12/2014 10:32:20

Paul T01/12/2014 16:05:27
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7161 forum posts
1214 photos
2 articles

Hello Gareth

Please don't go winding Bob up or trying to get him to change direction as I am looking forward to seeing the VGC on the water.

Another reason for not disturbing Bob is that I am hoping to enlist his building expertise on my latest design which will challenge all of his hydrodynamic and aerodynamic construction skills.

I wont be giving to much away by saying the new design is smaller than Ellie and has fewer motors than Thor but it will be the fastest boat that I have ever conceived and at top speed it will positively fly.

Paul

Bob Abell04/12/2014 08:50:11
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8921 forum posts
2810 photos

Hello Gareth

Sorry if I appear too critical, but a brushless motor is not really in keeping with your model

An old fashioned MFA 540 would be more suitabell? And one of those boxy Esc thingies?

Bob

Gareth Jones04/12/2014 13:04:08
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791 forum posts
1067 photos

I dont think you are being too critical Bob so don't worry about me taking offence.

I am just embracing todays technology. It might be a model of a 90 year old motorised sailing barge and I hope it will look the part from the outside but, on the inside it will be state of the art, efficient and reliable. My motor of choice would have been a Graupner 720BB Torque but they are just not available anymore. So, rather than look for an alternative old technology brushed motor I decided to use the opportunity to try something new. Even if I had used a brushless motor I would not have fitted a 'Bob's board' speed controller but a reliable efficient Mtroniks one.

Its a bit like the Abell drives in your latest model. I think with each new model we build we should try something new, push the boundaries a bit, learn some new ideas and experiment with different materials. Spider J will be the first model I have built where I want to represent a riveted steel plate hull so I have to decide what material to make the plates from, how to shape them to fit the curved bow and stern, how to stick them on, how to simulate the rivets etc. If everybody just kept on building the same type of model, the same way, over and over again life would be pretty dull. Doing something different makes it interesting and fun.

Gareth

Gareth Jones23/12/2014 20:00:46
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791 forum posts
1067 photos

Planking is now complete on Spider J's hull.

spider 32.jpg

spider 33.jpg

In this view you can admire the sleek curvaceous, brick like lines of the hull.

spider 34.jpg

spider 35.jpg

spider 36.jpg

spider 37.jpg

Reluctantly I have to admit Bob Abell is right, the planking does look a bit hotch potch. However I have a long term plan to atone for this lapse in quality control. It was always the plan to build two hulls, the first to be completed as a Humber sloop and the second as a Humber keel. The first hull will be plated to represent a rivetted steel plate hull and the hotch potch planking will be hidden. The second hull will be built as a wooden hulled keel, although I don't think I will build it with a true representation of the internal timber frames, just make the planking on the outside of the hull and inside of the hold representative of the real construction. That should be a good enough incentive for me to do it properly next time. I will have to arrange a trip into the maritime museum in Hull to take some photos of the wooden model in their exhibition.

Here are a couple more pictures.

spider 38.jpg

spider 39.jpg

The next job is filling and rubbing down the planking before the hull is covered in a layer of glass cloth and resin. I am not sure what resin to use yet. Shemarah was done with David's Fastglass resin but this time I think I will try Z-poxy finishing resin as I have been told its easier to sand.

That's all for now. I would like to wish all our readers, contributers and moderators a very merry Christmas and a happy new year, all the best for 2015 and I look forward to meeting some of you at the shows and regattas next year.

Regards

Gareth Jones

 

 

Edited By Gareth Jones on 23/12/2014 20:03:16

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