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Sir Lancelot

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Robin Lee31/03/2010 18:59:51
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129 forum posts
122 photos
Hi Paul. The windlass looks very good and the weathering has certainly brought it to life. The kit parts look high quality - did they require much work on them before painting? Some kit suppliers who will remain un-named provide white metal parts of dubious quality requiring much filing and filling and sanding or even replacement with a scratch made substitute.
Robin
Paul Godfrey31/03/2010 21:07:22
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163 forum posts
292 photos
Hi Robin,
 
I've been very happy indeed with the overall quality of the white metal parts - with the odd exception, the parts are very detailed and crisp, and go together well. Yes, some parts do need some extra work to get them looking good, but when building a well-weathered boat such as this, a bit of surface-texture can actually look better, especially when a 'rusty' finish is needed.
 
I do wish that manufacturers would cast gear wheels in such a way that the join-line doesn't run through the teeth, as this is almost impossible to clean up properly!!
 
Thanks for your comments Robin, see you soon.
 
Regards, Paul.
Paul Godfrey14/04/2010 21:08:17
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163 forum posts
292 photos
I've just about finished the wiring-up of the electrical goodies, and the following photos shows both the electrics tray, and the two batteries with their own looms attached:
 
 
 
 
As previously described, the batteries can be slid into place on 'rails', and each one having it's own wiring loom makes removal, if needed, easier. The looms will be clipped to the inside of the hull, and routed to where they will connect to the wires exiting the rear of the tray.

The individual components have been listed and described previously, as has the construction of the tray. You will note however, that an 'extension' has been added to the rear of the tray, and this houses the three switches (main power, smoke, and sounds), together with the charging jacks for the two batteries.
One of my aims is to be able to switch everything on & off  easily when at the lake (this includes the smoke oil valve which I have briefly touched upon in a previous posting, but yet to complete), without having to remove the superstructure and all the rigging which attaches to it. With the removable tray idea, the switches & jacks either had to be attached to the boat and have connections which could be seperated to allow removal of the tray, or alternatively be attached to the tray itself. After much head scratching, I decided to position them within the raised rear superstructure area, and make the rear gun turret which sits on top, removable. A hole will be cut into the superstructure top, allowing access to the switches and jacks, once the turret has been lifted off. The following pics show the tray in position, with the extension resting at deck level, and how the (as yet untouched) superstructure will cover it:
 


 The last two photos show the position where the wires exit the rear of the tray, together with the extension:
 


In the last photo but one, the three connectors exiting this side of the extension are for the motor and the two battery looms,  the black and red wires (with small red cable tie) are attached to the charging jacks at one end, and will connect to wires with the battery looms, the two green wires on the other side of the extension are for the speaker (see previous posts for installation of this), and finally the servo wire for the rudder servo.
 
Lastly, in the above phote, you can just make out the blue silicon tube which is attached to the propshaft oiling pipe, and which passes through a hole made in the rear horizontal platform of the tray. This allows oiling of the propshaft without removal of the electrics tray.
 
Thats all for now. Next will be the completion of the front gun and platform.
 
Paul.
Robin Lee16/04/2010 14:16:40
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129 forum posts
122 photos
Hi Paul, the concept of all the electrics being installed in a modular form has worked out very well. Once again your descriptions coupled with excellent photography is setting new standards for this forum. As I know you personally from us both being members of Brentwood MY&PBC I am aware you work for a bank but surely you must be an engineer in disguise!
Regards
Robin 
Paul Godfrey16/04/2010 18:18:22
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163 forum posts
292 photos
Hi Robin
 
Thanks again for your comments.
 
I think it's because I work for a bank that I enjoy hobbies such as model making,  photography (ie using my hands more than my brain), and also being outdoors, so this particular hobby is great for many reasons!!
 
I'll be bringing the boat along to tonights meeting, so you can judge it properly! (be kind!).
 
Regards, Paul.
Paul Godfrey27/05/2010 20:26:05
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163 forum posts
292 photos
I've been concentrating on the front section of the main deck since my last post, with the next bag of white-metal components, bag 3, covering this area. Here's a  photo of the contents of bag 3:
 

 The next photos show close-ups of some of the items:
 


 
The nuts and bolts in the one-but-last photo are used to hold down the mast base and the gallows, by passing through holes that need to be drilled into the deck.
 
Bag 3 also includes the parts needed to complete the front gun platform (the gun itself is bag 4, and will therefore be next on the agenda), and the following pic shows this completed:
 

The lockers were constructed in the same way as the water tanks on the foredeck, and was described in an earlier posting.
The rope seen above was purchased on e-bay, comes in several thicknesses, and looks super. It does need a little drop of superglue applied before cutting, to prevent it unravelling.
The brass railings were also an aftermarket purchase, for the same reason as the foredeck railings, ie the supplied wire is a little thin, and can be accidentally bent very easily. I have never bent wire into a perfect circle before, and it made me think about ways of doing this accurately. I firstly tried to bend the wire around a large tube, more or less the same diameter as the railings, but of course, this sprung open to a much larger size when released from the tube. It therefore occurred to me to wrap the wire around a much smaller object, and after a little experimentation, I found the ideal diameter size to be around 2 inches or so. This meant wrapping a suitable length of wire around a vitamin bottle (!) several times, and when released, was virtually the correct size for the platform.
I first glued 3 stanchions in 3 of the adjacent pre-drilled holes in the gun platform, and left them overnight to fully dry. I then fed both the upper and lower pre-bent railings through these stanchions, and glued them to the first stanchion only. I then slid a couple more stanchions onto the other end of both wires, and glued them into the next 2 holes in the platform. Once dry, another 2 stanchions were slid on & glued, and so on until all were fitted. When fully dry, the excess lengths of wire were cut off at the final stanchion, leaving the gap where the ladder to the main deck fits.
On the subject of the ladder, Mountfleet supply 2 ladders (the same as the ones which link the main deck to the foredeck), which need joining and cutting to produce one longer ladder of a sufficient size to stretch between platform and main deck. Once I had measured for the length required, I cut and glued the 2 supplied ladders together, ensuring that the gap between the rungs either side of the join were equal to the others. Once dry, I decided to fit a length of thin steel wire down the full length of both uprights to add further strength, and this was done using thick superglue, with the ladder laid face-down on my building board.  With the completed ladder painted, these wires just appear to be part of it, and indeed are barely noticeable.
 
The final 3 photos are of the almost completed front main deck area - just the gallows to be added, which are currently being built. The crews & officers companion ways, and the escape scuttle, are just laying on the deck at the moment as wires for the lighting in these items will be fed through first. Once the LEDs are fitted, these items will be glued into place, and the doors fitted.
 



Thats all for now. As mentioned, the gallows are being built, and the gun will follow after this.
Paul.
 
neil howard-pritchard27/05/2010 22:04:27
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2260 forum posts
2759 photos
fantastic work , paul......i'm glad i sold mine now.........i could never have reached that beautiful build standard. superb.
neil
Paul Godfrey29/05/2010 10:41:49
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163 forum posts
292 photos
Hi Neil,
 
Thanks very much for your comments (but I'm sure you could have built yours even better!!).
 
Regards, Paul.
neil howard-pritchard29/05/2010 12:13:06
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2260 forum posts
2759 photos
not a chance matey....i'm a bally awful painter for a start, lol.when are we going ta see ya on here.come and have a dabble..we don't bite, lol
 
Robin Lee29/05/2010 15:55:55
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129 forum posts
122 photos
Hi Paul,
I do like your logical approach to building and your taking the time and effort to producing this build log. Your method of constructing the railings around the gun platform is interesting. I think some other builders might have approached this by bonding all stanchions to the paltform then feeding the circular railings through all the stanchions. Your method of progressively threading the stanchions onto the railing then bonding  the stanchion avoids any possibilty of the railings binding in the stanchions.
Keep up the good work.
Regards
Robin

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