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Fisher 34 motorsailer

R/C near scale yacht

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gecon22/08/2020 08:31:12
418 forum posts
352 photos

20200820_095937.jpgTesting out some ideas for the wheelhouse and cabin top. Will have to make facilities for removeable top sections for access the the hull. Cabin and wheelhouse sides will be glued to the deck for watertightness but the 'roof' sections will have to be removeable. Sheet for the main boom is to be routed through the aft edge of the wheelhose roof and some of the standing rigging is to be anchored to the roof too so the whole wheelhouse roof cannot be made removeable -starting to thinkidea aloud now, sorry.

Thought of using small magnets and/or velcro or small hatch fasteners. Haven't yet found out what will be best. Probably a combination og methods.

Is there any particular 'favourved securing method' among the learned?

George

Edited By gecon on 22/08/2020 08:37:23

Edited By gecon on 22/08/2020 08:38:03

gecon22/08/2020 17:03:34
418 forum posts
352 photos

20200822_173947.jpgRemoved all the 'test' superstructure and started on the sail control runs for the genoa. The radio control gear is new to me and I have spent a few hours trawling through the huge instruction book to allocate two genoa servos to sliders on the transmitter. As usual, I don't really know what I'm doing but I'm doing it anyway.

Rudder tube has been sealed (I hope) and the rudder connected to the servo and it even turns the same way as the Tx rudder stick!

20200822_173848.jpgI hate to brag, but I've actually exceeded myself today....almost impressed even! Probably just beginners luck.

George

Edited By gecon on 22/08/2020 17:04:37

Ray Wood 222/08/2020 19:12:11
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2357 forum posts
829 photos

Hi George,

I shall be watching with interest your Genoa control system 😀 I never thought it was worth the bother of dragging the sail forward and round the mast onto the other side for the opposite tack, good luck with all those lines under the deck !! If you can keep the standing rigging away from the wheel house that may simplify things?

Regards Ray

gecon23/08/2020 08:12:09
418 forum posts
352 photos

Good morning Ray, -and of course, anybody elsesmiley

I too shall be watching with interest! Certainly for a model of this type there is probably only a small performance advantage in utilising a scale-ish genoa. Had I not owned a 1:1 version years ago, I would not have bothered with the genoa hassel. Had I thought about the cost early enough I would deffinateley have reconsidered! Using a small foresail and refering to it as a "working jib" would suffice. Wouldn't even need a servo on it!

The foresail on Ralph Stockton's F46 was a 'working jib' and he even had electric roller reefing on it! Ralph was an engineer. I'm just a glutton for punishment. I am going to try to make a manual roller reefed genoa so that all sail area can be reefed /stowed to allow for motoring with the sails still visible -but reefed- on the boat.

Some standing rigging will probably have to go onto the aft edge of the wheelhouse roof. I have a plan for this -which is too boring for members to reamodel fisher 46 fish5feb08_004.jpgd about- so I'll post a photo when it's done...in 2-3 months or so?

Posting a pic of Ralph's F46.

Regards, George

Edited By gecon on 23/08/2020 08:15:04

gecon24/08/2020 08:21:34
418 forum posts
352 photos

20200824_090212.jpgThe 'test elastic' has now been replaced by 1mm dacron and steel springs on all 3 servos. Adjusted for direction and travel. Next is to attatch the sheets and make guide tubes to lead them out of the wheelhouse and aft cockpit.

George20200824_090219.jpg

Chris Fellows24/08/2020 11:57:33
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980 forum posts
643 photos

All clever stuff George.

I think when I build my motor sailer I will just set the sails to an optimum position and not adjust when underway. The main motive power is the motor anyway. We shall see.

Chris

gecon25/08/2020 07:06:51
418 forum posts
352 photos

Hi Chris, I'm not yet sure if it's 'clever' but it's getting complicated -I'm sure of that.

I must admit that my lack of experience is the reason for the complexity of this project. Had I worked out the cost and complexity vs user-enjoyment equation prior to starting I would have simplified the build. I would however not 'learned my lesson'. I have no regrets though, my grey cells have been put into action and I am more pleased with the results as each hurdle is crossed.

The Fisher 34 to me is a sort of 'labour of love'. So I hope there will not be a 'divorce' before she's launched! Neither from the Fisher nor the Admiralty!

I have sailed the Comtesse yacht a few times during the summer and my experiences with that indicate to me that some form of sail control is more or less essential. The wind often changes in strength and direction over the lake and I would say that it's deffinately desireable to have - at least the largest sail on board- controlable.

A free 'working jib' and mizzen sail -if fitted- would be OK tethered by round elastic but it think but a large mainsail needs to have a winch on it to give some user participation! You will need a good motor and a large rudder if you're going to be able to overcome the the power in the sails if the wind picks up.

Regards, George

gecon28/08/2020 06:49:06
418 forum posts
352 photos

Eyebolts for the main and mizzen mast now added. Guide tubes for the genoa sheets epoxied in place and cockpit decking fitted with clear silicon to permit 'surgical removal' if necessary. Servo-hatch in cockpit centre will need to be sealed in some way to allow easy removal + access to the rudder servo.  Maybe silicon and plumber's tape?  20200826_174334.jpg20200828_073607.jpg20200825_114317.jpgTrial fitting of genoa sheet  blocks on capping rail.

Edited By gecon on 28/08/2020 07:03:29

Chris Fellows28/08/2020 19:17:43
avatar
980 forum posts
643 photos
Posted by gecon on 25/08/2020 07:06:51:

Hi Chris, I'm not yet sure if it's 'clever' but it's getting complicated -I'm sure of that.

I must admit that my lack of experience is the reason for the complexity of this project. Had I worked out the cost and complexity vs user-enjoyment equation prior to starting I would have simplified the build. I would however not 'learned my lesson'. I have no regrets though, my grey cells have been put into action and I am more pleased with the results as each hurdle is crossed.

The Fisher 34 to me is a sort of 'labour of love'. So I hope there will not be a 'divorce' before she's launched! Neither from the Fisher nor the Admiralty!

I have sailed the Comtesse yacht a few times during the summer and my experiences with that indicate to me that some form of sail control is more or less essential. The wind often changes in strength and direction over the lake and I would say that it's deffinately desireable to have - at least the largest sail on board- controlable.

A free 'working jib' and mizzen sail -if fitted- would be OK tethered by round elastic but it think but a large mainsail needs to have a winch on it to give some user participation! You will need a good motor and a large rudder if you're going to be able to overcome the the power in the sails if the wind picks up.

Regards, George

Thanks George, I will need to do some thinking when the time comes!

Chris

gecon01/09/2020 09:03:49
418 forum posts
352 photos

20200901_075124.jpgNext section of building will probably be the aft cockpit area. I feel there's a lot that needs to be 'going on' simultaneously here. Have not thought out the sequence yet. Bought some 18mm wood dowel which will be shaped I hope and then integrated into the cockpit sides as sheet winch supports. As the photo of the 1:1 yacht shows, the supports are long 'towers' which go all the way down to the cockpit seating. These will then be 'absorbed' into the shaped cockpit combings and will almost disappear! A lot of work just to hide something. I could have pehaps just made a couple of 'rounded bumps' in the combings so we'll see how it goes when I rattled the greysa bit more.

Interested -as always- in any pertinent comments from 'the learned'.

Lovely Wx here in Stavanger today so I'll have to get out for a walk and get exposed to some sunshine. The rain -and building Wx- will come soon enough.

g20200901_092829.jpgecon

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