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Power and control

prop, shaft, motor, controller, etc

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Jay Harris 110/04/2020 03:30:18
20 forum posts
2 photos

I am SUPER new to this hobby, like less than 2 weeks really. This lock down finally gave me the time and excuse I needed to dive in... and dive in I did, into the deep end. I am currently working on a scratch built model from a set of plans called The Black Rose... this is a wooden tall ship a little over 2 feel long, about 1/48th scale. I have no idea how to sail, but I know that if I have a small slow motor and prop in it, I can putter around the local ponds without much trouble.

With that being said, I know NOTHING about the power train of model boats and all the ins and outs that go along with that. I have been watching a lot of videos, digging around a lot of websites, but man there is a lot of info out there. With so much information, I am getting overloaded. Can anyone point me in the right direction to get some simple info about what basic things I need to get this ship in the water, and moving around at a sailing pace? Here in the states its all about speed boats and racing and thats not really my thing. any help is appreciated, thank you all!

Ray Wood 210/04/2020 07:18:24
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2485 forum posts
862 photos

Hi Jay,

You clearly know more than nothing as your thread description lists what you need to propel your boat, you will need to make provision for a stern tube and shaft in the keel with some means of steering? Maybe a photo of the drawing of the stern would help us to advise you 😀

Regards Ray

Jay Harris 110/04/2020 07:40:48
20 forum posts
2 photos

Thanks Ray!

There are some great photos of the same build in another thread called "black rose", but here is an image of the PDF plans that I have, I am just now starting on the keel and the bulkheads (waiting for a bit more wood to arrive this week to finish that up, but now is the time to plan for such things!

Jay Harris 110/04/2020 07:45:27
20 forum posts
2 photos

my biggest issues right now are figuring out the right size of motor, type of prop, the drive shaft (no idea how that works with keeping things water tight) and a basic RC controller, battery and types of servos, etc.

My assumption is that battery will go near the middle just in front of the center mast, and the motor somewhere underneath the second deck in the back, just before the poop deck. I can only guess that my best bet here is to notch out the inner lower bit of the rudder and have the prop come out at the bottom of the keel at the rear? are there other, more viable, options?

ashley needham10/04/2020 08:50:57
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7323 forum posts
156 photos

Jay. For a starter, if you go to the home page and scroll down just a bit, in the centre is an article by Dave M concerning boat electrics. Should make it crystal clear for you. A low power 540 motor would likely do for you (MFA 540/1)

In addition, the features section with hints and tips contains a good few articles on all sorts of stuff including pictures of motor/coupling/shaft/prop layout. Waterproofing...basically the propshaft stops water getting in, as long as there is sufficient glue around it sealing the prop shaft to the hull.

Hoverer, inserting a propshaft in your model may be tricky as ideally it needs to come out centrally in line with the rudder. It would mean some artistic cutting and reinforcing internally and then making a larger rudder with a cutout.

It would be possible to have a small prop protruding from the side but not recommended.

I think several persons have built this vessel but not sure if any have motorised it?

Ashley

Edited By ashley needham on 10/04/2020 08:58:11

Ray Wood 210/04/2020 09:03:42
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2485 forum posts
862 photos

Hi Jay,

This is slightly different arrangement for a Friendship sloop from Maine, but the principal is the same as Ashley is describing. The stern tube is built into the keel and the external planking seals the hull, I think you main issue will ballast in the hull low down, or an external keel to keep the boat up the right way 😀

When I build this boat I will move the prop forward into a recess in the keel, to make the rudder easier to build .

Regards Rayimg_20200410_085420.jpg

Edited By Ray Wood 2 on 10/04/2020 09:07:11

ashley needham10/04/2020 09:20:14
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7323 forum posts
156 photos

Like Ray said! His illustration is the sort of thing you need, the different style of boat means you will need to keep your shaft lower, that’s all.

I would also think about a thin (sheet brass) rudder...don’t know what the plan says, but without a prop therudder is likely to be quite fat which won’t help the motoring at all.

Ashley. (Snaps please)

Malcolm Frary10/04/2020 11:23:07
1029 forum posts

If it is to be fitted with sails, any moving air will cause it to be a sailboat, and might well overpower the efforts of the prop.

Since it is only 2 feet long, and not intended to be fast, I would consider a 5 pole 385 motor intended for a max of 15 volts, but run on about 6 volts. The smaller motor (smaller than a 540) gives more choice of where to fit it. It also weighs less, and a boat like this will need as much ballast as possible as low as possible. Even more so if sails are fitted.

Adding a motor to a sailboat always raises the center of gravity, and this is never a wanted thing on a sailboat.

Jay Harris 110/04/2020 16:19:03
20 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by ashley needham on 10/04/2020 09:20:14:

Like Ray said! His illustration is the sort of thing you need, the different style of boat means you will need to keep your shaft lower, that’s all.

I would also think about a thin (sheet brass) rudder...don’t know what the plan says, but without a prop therudder is likely to be quite fat which won’t help the motoring at all.

Ashley. (Snaps please)

It calls for 3 mm balsa... my plan was to taper the balsa to a thinner edge on the front end to make it more like a wedge

ashley needham10/04/2020 16:53:17
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7323 forum posts
156 photos

3mm is ok. Would use thin ply personally, especially as it is in the propwash. (or will be)

Malcolm has a point, however you could consider using muslin for the sails, as I did with the London, to minimise wind resistance?

Ashley

img_1893.jpg

 

Edited By ashley needham on 10/04/2020 16:58:08

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