By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Dremel

Thames Tug Cullamix

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Banjoman30/01/2017 11:30:39
avatar
1142 forum posts
2414 photos

That is looking very good indeed, Ray!

Interesting, too, to note that you plan to set up the rudder control in scale fashion, using cable and rollers. What do you intend to use as cable? Scale steel wire? something else? And how do you intend to adjust the tension?

Mattias

Ray Wood 230/01/2017 12:11:24
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

Hi Mattias

The scale set up is a combination of chains and rods with springs to take shock loads, but to make it practical I'm proposing to use stainless steel plastic coated fishing trace, as it will easily go round the rollers and its easy to crimp the ends and use brass bottlescrews for tension with some dummy springs etc as the drawing. I thought I maybe able to make the tugs steering wheel move with an old sail winch, but maybe I'm dreaming cull drg 001.jpg, your yacht is looking great are you making the sails ?

Regards Ray

Banjoman30/01/2017 13:46:54
avatar
1142 forum posts
2414 photos

Hello Ray,

I see what you mean, and that should indeed both work and look more than good enough. A small caveat perhaps, although I'm sure you have already thought about it: those working brass bottlescrews tend to unscrew themselves quite easily, and are likely to need to be secured at the right level of tension. One way might be to get a few miniature nuts to fit whatever thread (M2? M2.5?) they have, unscrew the bottles, put on a nut either end and then screw the bottle back on. As long as you don't need to close the bottlescrews all the way in, once you're happy with the tension you just tighten the added nuts against the bottle ends, and it should all be stable enough. If adjustment is needed afterwards it will be easy enough to ease off on the securing nuts ...

As for making the steering wheel move, I'm sure it must be feasible, although it should be remembered that in real life such a wheel would, I think, be quite heavilly geared down (or up, depending on perspective), so that for a rudder movement of maybe 30 degrees, the wheel would need to be turned quite a number of full revolutions.

As I think I've already mentioned here on the forum, my wife and I spent five days on the VIC 32 up in Scotland for my 50th birthday back in 2015 (which, by the way, is when and where my avatar picture was taken), and the VIC 32 had one of those chain-and-roller steering set-ups.

Perhaps a slightly more primitive version, in that I don't think there was much in the way of shock-absorbing springs. As a matter of fact, there was quite an amount of slack in that chain, which the skipper expained was for reasons of both comfort and security for the helm -- any pressure or shocks against the rudder could be quite plainly felt through the wheel, and we were all told in no uncertain terms that whenever we felt a wave hit the rudder out in open water, we must immediately take both hands well away off the spokes, as a strong enough wave could easily set the wheel spinning with a force well beyond human strength to control and that could give one a very nasty rap or even break one's hand or arm.

After having had a few waves knock the wheel spinning while I was at the helm, I quite saw what he meant, and the slack in the chain gave us amateurs just enough warning to have time to let go off the wheel.

I dare say, though, that any tug operated by professionals in the (comparatively) narrow and congested waters of the Thames would have had a tighter set up rudder operation, and thus also put those shock absorbers to good use ...

Thank you very much, too, for your kind compliments about my Moonbeam build! And yes, I shall most certainly have a go at making the sails myself ...

Mattias

Ray Wood 230/01/2017 14:24:36
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

Hi Mattias

Good point about the turnbuckles, I've used closed loop controls on RC aeroplanes rudders & elevators and the tension doesn't have to be that great, I'm not sure the steering chains/pulleys are correct as shown on the drawing as most full size tugs seem to have the quadrant behind the rudder stock, as shown it would be a tiller ? and the geometry wouldn't keep the chain at a constant length. But the more models I make I realise the draughtsman/designer may have used artistic licence for the details not recorded. The drawings are at least as old as me (61) and are excellent in detail, the steering wheel would be driven by the sail winch drum separate from the actual steering servo I hope. I had this model in the late 60's which my uncle made but unfortunately it leaked like a sieve as he plated the hull with ply panels which the joints couldn't take the water pressure, I wish I'd kept the folding down funnel he made ! Good luck with the sail making, I've just bought an old Singer sewing machine with that in mind for my sailing barge needs a bigger main to win races

Regards Ray

Ray Wood 207/02/2017 14:06:19
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

Hi All

Taking a break from Cullamix for a few weeks back on MTB 71 with a few more fittings machine gun tub & guns and the pram dinghy, then we are done, seems a shame to paint it grey !!

Regards Rayf22 mtb71 feb 17 004.jpg

Ray Wood 221/04/2017 15:31:27
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

cullamix april 17 004.jpgcullamix april 17 005.jpgHi All

Finished some other projects and I'm back on Cullamix with the rubbing strip and fabricated bollards from dowel, ply & stirring sticks they should look ok when filled and painted.

Regards Raycullamix april 17 006.jpg

Ray Wood 226/04/2017 10:04:42
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

Hi All

With a Halfords spray red oxide primer, then satin black, the 2 types of deck bollards are complete trying complete the fittings out of the scrap box.f22 240417 015.jpg

Regards Ray

Ray Wood 228/04/2017 13:20:38
avatar
1998 forum posts
713 photos

cull winch 280417 001.jpgHi All

On with the foredeck anchor winch, 1/16" ply sides & base some brass rod and some turning, the main gear wheel is from one these new fangled white tape dispenser (Like Tipex in the old days) and the small pinion is from a Scaletrix motor It's only a cosmetic job and the drawings not great but I think it looks the part

The rear parting off tool on my lathe is a great device and saves loads of time.

Regards Raycull winch 280417 003.jpg

Bob Abell29/04/2017 06:49:36
avatar
8907 forum posts
2783 photos

Very nice, Ray

I like the bollards too...........It's very pleasing to build something up from scrap and once painted, nobody would how it was made

What make is your lathe?.....It looks very handy for Model Engineering

Keep up the good work

Bob

neil howard-pritchard29/04/2017 21:02:27
avatar
1484 forum posts
790 photos

HI BOB, It's a Myford, but don't know what model, as I have an ML10 and it doesn't look like mine, but nor does it look like a "newer" version of the ML7 the more popular model engineers lathe. I think its a myford super 7

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Boats? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Boats!

Support Our Partners
Restorers Wanted
Premier March
Shrek
Sarik
Nylet
Tony Green Steam
Pendle Boilers
Shopping Partners
Social Media

'Like' us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Pin us on Pinterest

Member Contributions
Distributors of Model Boats for our overseas readers
Highlights

Make sure you never miss out on the latest news, product reviews and competitions with our free RSS feed

Make your own contribution to the Website

We welcome well written contributions from Website members on almost any aspect of Model Boating with a particular emphasis on practical hints, tips, experience and builds.

In order to maintain a consistent standard and format, all suggestions should first be sent to me by Personal Message for approval in principle. Only a very limited amount of time is available for editing contributions into a suitable format for placing on the website so it is important that the material is well presented, lucid and free from obvious spelling errors. I think it goes without saying that contributions should be illustrated by appropriate photos. I shall be happy to give advice on this.

The Member Contribution area offers space for short informative mini articles which would not normally find a place in Model Boats magazine. It is an opportunity for Website Members to freely share their  expertise and experience but I am afraid that virtue is its own reward as there is no budget to offer more material recompense!

I look forward to receiving your suggestions.

Colin Bishop - Website Editor