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Member postings for Pierre

Here is a list of all the postings Pierre has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Forum problems
25/02/2009 21:22:07
Bob must be reaching his dot - age! 
Cheers - Pierre
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thread: Ship Docking Module
25/02/2009 21:19:05
Hi Phil
Spot on - thats exactly what I'm building. Not a lot of information on these tugs , there are about eight in the States and two in Spain. Seabulk owns the patent and if anyone is interested  their website has very interesting videos on these tugs.
The build  is progressing slowly:
Side planking almost completed.

Bottom plating completed, showing the two skegs - centre panel is 4mm plywood, side panels 4mm balsa.
 
A question for the collected wisdom of the listers - I've completed the planking (balsa) and sealed it with 5 coats of sanding  sealer. Then I coated it with one coat of  fibreglass resin, inside and out. I hate working with glass cloth and am inclined just to give it a second coat of resin without cloth. Question: how much strength does the cloth impart to the structure?
TIA - Cheers - Pierre
 

 
Thread: Barrel Back....
20/02/2009 21:16:57
Hi Paul
Your model looks great! I was just wondering how you control your motor, speedwise?
Also the rudder servo -how big a servo are you going to need to turn a presumably fairly large rudder?
I'm enjoying your pics - reminds me of building a mirror dinghy years ago!
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: Rubber power
19/02/2009 21:28:03
rubber powered boats???  Are we still in the  twenties?  my first thoughts when I read this post>  After a bit of  mature reflection I thought that this could actually be a great way to get club members together _ our club has been gradually  suffering a decline in membership _ this might be a way of regenerating interest!
anyway< whoever takes up this chalenge< good luck!
cheers _ pierre
Thread: what basic tools?
10/02/2009 22:14:49
Hi Anthony
What sort of models are you interested in? - static models, R/C, sailing, fast electric ?
The basic tools are always the same though later as you mention you will want to diversify.
Thinking about the toolsI use the most, I've whittled it down to a fairly basic list .I've made models with ONLY these, though other listers will probably augment the list.
My most used tool: a good cutting knife - I use one that holds Stanley blades and change them often!  Second a STEEL ruler and a cutting mat. This takes care of  straight cuts - I've cut up to 4mm plywood with this method though that is rather a chore!  My Stanley knife is my number one implement1
Curved cuts - fretsaw with a fretsaw stand. I used this for years, though now I've gotten lazy and bought an electric scroll saw.
 A variety of clamps, clothespegs, plastic clamps, metal etc etc
I work mostly in wood, so use ordinary white wood glue. Plastic obviously would require different glues.
A variety of sandpaper and sandpaper blocks - I like those hard rubber blocks that one can secure the paper to.
A small rigid saw with a mitre block (optional) 
A small hand drill and various small drill bits.
Later on you will need paint, varnishes etc etc.
Those to me are the implements I would have with me on a desert isle! I'm sure other listers will add to this!
Hope this helps
Pierre

Thread: rudderless control
08/02/2009 20:24:49
There was a full article on an amphicar in Model Boats about  18 months ago (I think).
If you like I could dig out my back issue or possibly  it could be searched for........?
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: Ship Docking Module
08/02/2009 06:09:56
Aaah, you guys are just old fashioned, this is the latest state of the art  tug technology!
Must admit  that it really does look weird!
I'm going to build it up to deck level and then test it in my pool - if it's a waste of time then I can go onto something else.
One aspect that has been occupying me is the control system - I have a 6 channel JR. Voith Schneider units can be configured to use either 4 channels which gives huge flexibility but is difficult to drive, or two channels which is easier to drive but loses in manoeuverability.
To enable the SDM to go sideways, each Voith unit needs 2 channels which means (I think) using both sticks on my transmitter,up/down for ahead/astern and left/right for port/starboard.  Should be quite challenging to drive!
Cheers -Pierre
07/02/2009 12:00:53

Bottom and frames of the SDM in place. Voith unit rings epoxied in - unfortunately tops of motors will extend above deckline, so will have to box them in. Schottel units would have been better, but then I would have to have bought them!
Side planking next.
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: Uploading to albums
07/02/2009 09:24:46
Whew, after a lot of sweat, finally managed to upload photos to an album!
Sorry Mr. moderator but I think there is something very buggy about this section of the site - constant hangups and slow connections. I had trouble uploading more than 2 pics at a time, otherwise the dreaded hourglass became permanent!  I had the same result on three computers - my desktop, my laptop and my son-in-law's laptop .
Anyone interested have a look at my last picture - totally off this lists topics, but I couldn't resist adding it!
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: South African Clubs
06/02/2009 21:17:07
Hi Sandy
The club I belong to in CapeTown is the Western Cape Model Boat Club - we utilise a small lake in the Durbanville area (Sonstraal dam) which unfortunately is in chaos at the moment as it is being dredged.  We normally sail every first and third Sunday of the month.
 
There is another club only for IOMs which utilises Milnerton lagoon - sorry dont know too much about them as I'm not terribly interested in çompetitive racing. There is (or was) another group for i/c racing but I think they've been driven underground by the noise restrictions.
 
Hope this helps - drop me an email if you want phone numbers etc.
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: quo vadis?
03/02/2009 21:35:44
Hi Ashley
 
Good Point.................Life is faster, money more accessible. It's tempting to buy something ready made, obviously I've done the same.........I dont build ESCs, motors, computers etc.
But I do like to differentiate between hobbies and pastimes. Hobbies to  me are creative, making something, using your talents to build something to the best of your ability. Pastimes are exactly that, buying something ready made and using it to, well... pass the time.  I'm passionate about reading but I wouldn't call it a hobby. I love motorbikes but because I don't fix them  riding them is only a pastime.  I fly kites, but because I make them (yes I sew) I class that as a hobby.
Sorry for the rant, I really dont want to put any one off RTRs, everone to their own, I guess.
Cheers - Pierre
 
03/02/2009 17:24:28
Hi Paul and Bob
 
I tend to agree with both of you- building the hull is definitely the best  part - I feel a huge sense of accomplishment when I've finally cut out all the frames and they all fair up (well almost, anyway!). I've been forced to switch to balsa planking as it's about the only cheaply available wood (?) here.  After two layers of epoxy resin, fibre cloth and huge amounts of elbow grease, it's not too bad.
 
Our currency is currently about 15 to 1 here in SA so you do the maths!!
Cheers -Pierre
 
03/02/2009 16:10:32
WHOOAAH, sorry, don't know what happened there, somehow pasted a double entry.
Apologies to the list!!
Pierre
03/02/2009 16:02:36
Hi All

Two weeks ago I was browsing in a second hand bookshop and had the good fortune to stumble on a cache of about thirty Model Boat magazines dating back to the late 60s and early 70s.
Needless to say I grabbed them with glee (they were about 50p each) and have had many enjoyable hours browsing through them.
I was struck by the differences then and now  - this is a trite statement, obviously times have moved on, but  I found the old magazines far more interesting than present day.
The big difference no Ready to Run ,no Almost Ready to Run, virtually no kits. These werent generally available so modellers actually BUILT their models from the hulls up.  The mags were crammed with interesting articles on all sorts of  topics scale, yachting, steam, tugging, fast electrics, hydros, straight running, various methods of construction etc etc.
Every time I receive my latest magazine, Im struck by the proportion of models that are built on a commercially available hull Im  sticking my neck out here, but I reckon the ratio could be as high as 80 per cent. 
Here in the colonies, where our currency is rubbish, we have to build our hulls ourselves is basic hull construction gradually dying out in the UK?  Will the colonies gradually take over the world??
Listening to Eve of Destruction  and buckling on the flak jacket!
Cheers - Pierre
TESTHi All

Two weeks ago I was browsing in a second hand bookshop and had the good fortune to stumble on a cache of about thirty Model Boat magazines dating back to the late 60s and early 70s.
Needless to say I grabbed them with glee (they were about 50p each) and have had many enjoyable hours browsing through them.
I was struck by the differences then and now - this is a trite statement, obviously times have moved on, but I found the old magazines far more interesting than present day.
The big difference no Ready to Run ,no Almost Ready to Run, virtually no kits. These werent generally available so modellers actually BUILT their models from the hulls up. The mags were crammed with interesting articles on all sorts of topics scale, yachting, steam, tugging, fast electrics, hydros, straight running, various methods of construction etc etc.
Every time I receive my latest magazine, Im struck by the proportion of models that are built on a commercially available hull Im sticking my neck out here, but I reckon the ratio could be as high as 80 per cent.
Here in the colonies, where our currency is rubbish, we have to build our hulls ourselves is basic hull construction gradually dying out in the UK? Will the colonies gradually take over the world??
Listening to Eve of Destruction and buckling on the flak jacket!
Cheers - Pierre
Thread: Ship Docking Modules
30/01/2009 19:35:27
Hi Paul
 
You're right, all the information I've been able to find has come from SeaBulk.  If you're really interested download their promotional pamphlet, it contains the side elevation that I posted.  The other bit of information is from the US patent office - I can send you the PDF if you want.
BTW, what CAd program are you using?
Top Dawg? - you're the MAANNN!!!!
 
Regards - Pierre
 
 
Thread: Slo-mo-shun
30/01/2009 14:05:26
Thanks  Bob
I did still remember my elementary maths!

Regards - Pierre
Thread: Ship Docking Modules
30/01/2009 12:37:06

Hi All

Ive always been interested in off-beat marine vessels and so when I came across some pictures of a new tug called a Ship Docking Module (SDM for short), I decided this would be my next project.

The tug has a length/beam ratio of 9 to 5 and is symmetrical  fore and aft. It has a flat bottom with an extremely shallow draft and utilizes 2 schottel units which are offset from the centre line, one to port and one to starboard. Two small skegs on the centre line complete the underwater profile.

The tug has been designed to push as efficiently sideways as in a fore/aft direction and has a top speed of 6.5 knots SIDEWAYS!
 
Heres an aerial view:
 
 
Another view from forward:


 

 

These pictures courtesy of www.seabulktowing.com . Anyone knowing of any other pictures, I would be grateful theres not a lot of information available. There is a very interesting video on the above site as well, showing the tug picking up a container ship on the bow, sideways. As a tugmaster myself I found this particularly fascinating!

 I also managed to dig out the US patent for the hull shape which was useful for the angles of rise of floor etc. Extensive use is made of flat plating, to cut down costs, which will simplify building (I hope)

I have started building, and have so far cut out the flat bottom and the frames. I will be using two Graupner Voith Schneider units, because I have them sitting in my workshop.

Will post pictures if I manage to send this to the site havent been too successful so far with pictures!

Regards - Pierre

 

Thread: Slo-mo-shun
30/01/2009 12:05:11
Hi Paul
Glad you found the plans useful!
 
At least (I presume ) you wont need to convert all those 7/16ths and 5/32s  that made no sense to a metrically educated modeller!
Regards - Pierre
 
ps - hope you find my plans of the SDM as interesting. (if I manage to upload it)
Thread: Trouble uploading?
23/01/2009 10:57:19
Thanks for the input..........................I've tried single uploads,as well as reducing the size of the image, still no joy.
I'm using Firefox as a browser, maybe I need to go back to IE (yawn). Will also check my firewall settings and see if that makes any difference.
Thanks again
Pierre
Thread: Big Dawgs
23/01/2009 07:04:04
Every  user group I've been on has it's  "Big Dawg".  Possibly the longest serving member, the most vociferous, the most opinionated, the stubbornest, the know-it-all.
 Lurking for a while,  one soon gets an idea of the general tenor of the site.
 
So in your opinion, who's the " Big  Dawg"  (or "Dawgs") on this site?
Cheers - Pierre
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