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Member postings for Jonathan Kinghorn

Here is a list of all the postings Jonathan Kinghorn has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Puzzling Pond Yacht
07/10/2021 13:51:46

Thanks for looking redpmg, I really appreciate it.

I was buying from Hobbies and using their catalogues in the late 70s and early 80s when helping my mother with her doll house hobby, and wonder if this may be why this model yacht looks strangely familiar?

I will certainly search for Gareth and Elizabeth Jones to see if I can pick their brains about my yachts.

05/10/2021 14:22:41

Thank you all for the responses. I have been in touch with the UK VMYG about another of my yachts, but so far without any response. Hobbies of Dereham is a great suggestion, and would explain a lot about this model, thank you so much for that suggestion.

The steering on this model is of the Braine gear type, and should indeed be connected to the main sheets and mainsail but this rigging is currently entirely missing. The jib boom, however, is set up to connect to the Braine quadrant, which is an unusual refinement on such a small and simple yacht. This is what makes me suspect that the rigging has been set up wrongly.

I will certainly search earlier posts to see what I can learn and who I might bug.

03/10/2021 21:59:44

I recently bought a pond yacht on eBay and wonder if anyone here recognizes the design? She was sold as dating from the 1950s but is clearly much younger, perhaps from the 1970s or 80s. She is a bit of a puzzle—a free sailing model too small for club racing but too sophisticated to be a toy. The rigging for the main sheets to the Braine gear quadrant is missing and there is no sign of blocks or fairleads for it ever having been fitted to the deck. But there is monofilament fishing line rigging set up to connect the jib boom to the quadrant. (I can’t figure out how this should be set up and am thinking now that the main sheets may have been rigged to the jib boom in error, although there is no horse for jib sheets.) Most of the rigging is braided line, with neat round bowsies on the booms and rectangular bowsies elsewhere. I am beginning to wonder if this boat was built from a kit, but the adjustable step for the mast and the Braine gear quadrant are clearly home-made. Curiously, the selvage of both sails is on the luff rather than the leach. She is 30 inches ( cm) long with a beam of inches ( cm). Any thoughts?

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Thread: Model Railways
08/08/2021 11:30:43

I did paint the tunnel portal, like all structures for my project it is scratch built. All card and wood in this case, including dolls house moldings for the fancy bits. It needs a lot more weathering--the real portal is still black with soot today. The portal will be largely buried in a cutting.

08/08/2021 01:32:14

I've been working on Welwyn North station c.1935 in N gauge--no layout yet so I'm working on buildings when I'm not working on boats. The second photo shows rough models made to help me work out how to make the real things.

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Thread: What's the foresail on a cutter-rigged ketch called?
07/08/2021 11:52:09

Forestaysail, Fore for short. As has been noted, sails rigged to a bowsprit are Jibs. A cutter would set one jib only, but would carry several in graduated sizes to set as conditions warranted (it wasn't safe to reef a sail on a bowsprit.)

On an identical vessel with just one headsail (a combination of a cutter's jib and fore sails) it would be termed the Foresail, and the vessel would be Sloop, not a Cutter.

Thread: Mystery steering fitting
07/08/2021 02:11:49

I recently acquired a 53" pond yacht hull that appears to date from the mid 1890s and to have been rigged originally as a yawl. It was acquired locally in the 1980s by a member of the Mill Pond Model Yacht Club in Port Washington on Long Island, a few miles from Manhattan, from whose son I obtained it. It is associated with an earlier resident of Port Washington named James W. Smith, and is thought to have been built by him. It retains its original (and very simple) steering device. On the deck forward of the tiller is a more recent fitting to which an elastic band can be tensioned. Below the this fitting there are several concentric circular marks on the deck made by an earlier fitting that was fixed to the with a single central screw. Does anyone have an idea what this earlier fitting might have been?

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We welcome well written contributions from Website members on almost any aspect of Model Boating with a particular emphasis on practical hints, tips, experience and builds.

In order to maintain a consistent standard and format, all suggestions should first be sent to me by Personal Message for approval in principle. Only a very limited amount of time is available for editing contributions into a suitable format for placing on the website so it is important that the material is well presented, lucid and free from obvious spelling errors. I think it goes without saying that contributions should be illustrated by appropriate photos. I shall be happy to give advice on this.

The Member Contribution area offers space for short informative mini articles which would not normally find a place in Model Boats magazine. It is an opportunity for Website Members to freely share their  expertise and experience but I am afraid that virtue is its own reward as there is no budget to offer more material recompense!

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