By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for Dave Cooper 6

Here is a list of all the postings Dave Cooper 6 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Returning modeller
25/11/2020 10:40:04

Hi Jim

Regarding the glue - I've not tried "Gorilla" myself but have heard good things about it - particularly strength-wise.

My personal favourite wood glue is "Tightbond Original". There may have to be some additional hull water-proofing (I used sanding sealer followed by model aircraft 'dope', then aerosol paint . So far, no leak problems despite the inevitable beginner's crashes !

Do a good float test in the bath /pool before going to big water. I also used 2-pack epoxy where the prop shaft and rudder post penetrates the hull (inside and out).

Good luck,

Dave C

24/11/2020 10:25:06

Hi Jim

Coming back to your planking - I used a mix of 1/64 and 1/32 ply on my little RAF launch.

When used as a 'double-biax' - that is an "X" lamination with a good quality glue - it is massively strong. (It's how they made the full-size 70 foot launches after all).

Ray's glassing suggestion is well worth considering though as this makes the whole hull much more 'ding-proof'.

Regards,

Dave C

Thread: help - 1/250 scale Yamato
23/11/2020 10:44:30

Just a few thoughts :

For a beginner to RC boats (like me), it may be best to keep things simple eg single motor /ESC /single commercial rudder.

I don't know how you're planning to operate the model, but at 'harbour' speeds the rudder(s) may not be all that effective - so, going "multi-motor" gives extra steering assistance.

Build a simple balsa kit boat first to gain RC experience before going scale ???

Most importantly, have fun !

Dave C

ps For suitable kits, I'm sure the experts on the forum can advise you better then me

Thread: 1:24 RRS Discovery
09/11/2020 11:02:28

Hi Norman

When trying to trace leaks, I have in the past used the old trick of a drop of washing-up liquid placed, selectively, and one at a time inside the hull. Then a little warm water and, perhaps, gentle heat from a hair dryer along the outside of the test area. Watch for soap bubbles inside...

I think in your case, I would start with the prop' shaft and rudder areas first, then move onto the hull planking. This is if you want to preserve the structure "as is". Failing this, then re-glassing looks like the best bet as the experts have already suggested.

Good luck,

Dave C

Thread: Machine Tools
30/10/2020 10:42:29
Posted by Ray Wood 2 on 24/10/2020 07:22:48:

Hi Dave,

Maybe have a look at Model Engineer classified ads, there are quite a selection at the moment, you would never regret buying a Myford, but Warco's are fine. The Clarke's lathe/mill/drills are versatile.

Regards Ray

Ray

Just sent you a pm (thanks for any help !)

Dave

Thread: Returning modeller
28/10/2020 10:39:33

Hi Jim

I've not used a twin rudder set-up myself, but, the way I've seen others do it is to couple them together using an adjustable linkage - a threaded rod with ball links (or similar), to allow for them to be aligned. This linkage spans the two cranks at the top of each rudder post.

The steering servo then moves one rudder (via the same crank arm as above) then the other rudder will move in unison.

You can adjust the relative movement 'gearing' (servo-to-rudder) by choosing the appropriate holes on the two crank arms.

I expect one of the others will have a photo of this as the mechanism is really simple once seen.

Regards,

Dave C

Thread: Machine Tools
26/10/2020 10:51:28

Sounds great Neil - I'll certainly look out for one.

Dave

24/10/2020 11:37:04

Hi Both

Neil : That tool looks very useful indeed - I'll look out for one. I bet you need a good pair of protective gloves just in case...

Ray : Yes, a Myford would be great. I don't have space for a free-standing one, but, a bench model could work if they do one. I'll do a bit more research on the Warco's and Clarke's as well.

Shame we can't get to shows and auction houses at present to gauge wear etc on used equipment....roll on the C19 vaccine !

Regards, Dave

23/10/2020 17:29:52

Thanks for the reply David.

For the T45 tube, the 'critical' dimension is the i/d. It's actually 5mm wall as supplied from the stockholders. Inside this will be the EN14 (for the bearing registers), so I have a bit of wiggle room there.

The question is really relating to the capability of the mini-lathe type chuck's capacity. I have a feeling I will have to buy the next size up of lathe though to be able to machine this lot. Ideally, I'd like to stay with a bench-size model as workshop space is tight..

Good point about the tube o/d and i/d not being concentric - I hadn't thought of that ! Currently, I'm leaning toward the "Warco" range (on the recommendation of a friend), so will try to get some info' on mandrels etc. from their tech support desk.

Regards,

Dave

22/10/2020 23:48:11

Some parts I need to machine :-

1. T45 tube 60.3mm with the i/d turned to about 52mm

2. EN14 bar 55mm with the o/d an interference fit in 1. above and bored to take deep-groove bearings with tolerance 0 to -0.01mm

3. 300M bar - diamond (or similar) tipped tooling required ?

Hardly model boat stuff but relevant for lathe /chuck sizes that I need to buy soon. The lathe will also be used for model boat /engineering as well. Any guidance on chucks, faceplates, mandrels etc will be helpful...

Ray, (and other engineers) are you there ?

Dave

Thread: Guidance
19/10/2020 10:55:15

Hello

You could do a lot worse than have a look at Jerry Rosa's videos on Youtube. (Rosa String Works).

He's a guitar /Mandolin /Violin /Double-bass etc luthier and uses a lot of wood cut from his own farm using a variety of power saws, sanding and thicknessing kit that he's built and modified himself.

Although he's based in the 'States you can email him with sensible questions and I know he works with very thin wood sections during his day-to-day life. This will include all types of soft and hard woods...

Good luck with your projects,

Dave C

Thread: Caldercraft PCF Swift boat
16/10/2020 17:17:05

Ron

If you want to sell /trade your boats I would post up a few photos - there may just be a market for them.

You'll need to setup an "Album" first then, upload the photos to the album. After that, you can include them in the normal 'posting' windows (such as this) using the little camera icon - next to the "Smiley".

I'm sure the others will help with setting up the album if you get stuck...

Good luck,

Dave

Thread: wood breaking
12/10/2020 11:17:24

Paul

There is a bit of a fight going on here with the wood on the inside of the bend being in compression (squeezing) and that on the outside being in tension (stretching).

Guitar makers (aka Luthiers) use something called "Kerfing". If you look on the inside of an acoustic guitar this forms the 'shelf' that the top and bottom pieces are mounted on. It consists of partially sawn through slots that allow the wood to follow quite tight curves. Bob Abell's photo gives the general idea.

With 0.8mm thickness though the cuts would have to be very shallow. I would practice getting the depth and spacing right on a piece of scrap wood first. Then try heat /steam possibly with a weight on one end to ease the ply into shape. Patience is needed with Ashley's boiling saucepan approach but it does work (at least, I've used this method with hard(ish) balsa thicker than 0.8mm.

Good luck with your project.

Thread: Returning modeller
07/10/2020 23:51:07

Jim - just catching up on the thread, and, a few extra items on the electrical /radio side :

Like you, I had a broken battery connector on my Futaba /Acoms Tx. Mine was a spiral wound one rather than a flat tab that you reported. (I was checking the audio by-pass filter at the time and caught my sleeve in it !). The wire quality to the main PCB is not great and doesn't really like solder - mine has failed twice. I would reinforce carefully with good quality wire and add some heat shrink sleeving for extra support on the repair.

Dave M recommended 4Max as a supplier for the wattmeter. Although they deal mainly in aircraft stuff they are a really good supplier and give good general advice on chargers, motors etc.

It's worth looking at the "XT60" type connectors. They are a really nice little unit especially for on-board battery use. There is a 'big brother' as well for carrying the larger currents...

Dave C

Thread: Motors/prop for model warship
01/10/2020 21:45:51

A few random thoughts :

I once saw a boxed set of "Model World" for sale on an internet auction site. Price was on the high side, but, I'm kicking myself now.

Hmm, 3" beam sounds narrow(ish). I suppose if the CG is low enough it should be all right.

I have a 385 in a fast, planing hull with a 30mm /3 blade prop. It doesn't seem to get hot at all - I expect this is breaking all the 'rules' though.

Nice choice of subject. I think I can visualise a rotating scanner and (randomly) moving turrets. Arduino maybe ?

Dave

(ps I did say they were random !)

Thread: Machine Tools
15/09/2020 20:05:20

Hi Tim and Ray

Thanks for the warnings and comments. I should reiterate that the present set-up is just to see me through until I can find a lathe and a proper mill...

Some light grinding this afternoon on a piece of brass allowed working to about 5 thou" (hard to be exact without a DTI or digital calipers) - this with a rotary grinding wheel and brass work piece in the X-Y table.

There was some tool chatter, and so, I stop and check the chuck at regular intervals. Also, I let the Cub cool down in between runs, so, no need to report me to the RSPCA just yet Ray !

Incidentally, my local 'CNC' machine shop (who can work to 6 microns, so they say) charges £65 /hour. So, you don't actually have to do all that many hours to clock up the price of a good lathe.

Dave

15/09/2020 13:05:05

Above photos show a trial set-up of the new X-Y Table with the venerable Wolf Cub.

The jury's still out on accuracy ! First test was to rout a block of medium balsa. - this went well with the grain but needed a little clean-up with an X-Acto chisel across the grain. Certainly good for bulk removal of material though using a ball-ended Dremel cutter.

Next tests will be in metal. Probably one milling job followed by a vertical turning in brass I expect.

I think it should be alright for small boat parts. Cost so far under £100...

15/09/2020 12:52:49

x-y table 1.jpgx-y table 2.jpg

12/09/2020 11:07:30

Well the 'X-Y' vice arrived this week and it looks very similar to the second photo from Paul T.

It was a budget model and needs a bit of work. The threads and ways are fine but some of the castings will need a clean up around the edges. Also, there is some play in the thread registers /receivers and these will probably need a spring or maybe a bushing or two to remove.

All-in-all, not bad value for the money and 1,000% better than what I've got now ! No doubt it will further my engineering a little...

Dave

03/09/2020 21:24:53

Lots of good advice again guys - thanks.

OK - sentimental admission time : I recently lost a very old screwdriver at one of our R/C slope flying sites. It wasn't even particularly good, but, it was my favourite !

Also, the Wolf Cub was my Dad's (I haven't seen him since I was 21, but that's another story). It's been professionally re-wired and checked for safety etc and runs well. I have several other makes as well, but, the main thing is that it has a round, parallel collar which enables a secure clamp to the drill press. All my other drills have weird tapers, lumps and bumps and things in the way...

My wife says I much prefer my old clothes to new ones - I think tools must be like this too ?

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Boats? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Boats!

Support Our Partners
Restorers Wanted
Tony Green Steam
Sarik
Premier March
Nylet
Shrek
Pendle Boilers
Shopping Partners
Social Media

'Like' us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Pin us on Pinterest

Member Contributions
Distributors of Model Boats for our overseas readers
Highlights

Make sure you never miss out on the latest news, product reviews and competitions with our free RSS feed

Make your own contribution to the Website

We welcome well written contributions from Website members on almost any aspect of Model Boating with a particular emphasis on practical hints, tips, experience and builds.

In order to maintain a consistent standard and format, all suggestions should first be sent to me by Personal Message for approval in principle. Only a very limited amount of time is available for editing contributions into a suitable format for placing on the website so it is important that the material is well presented, lucid and free from obvious spelling errors. I think it goes without saying that contributions should be illustrated by appropriate photos. I shall be happy to give advice on this.

The Member Contribution area offers space for short informative mini articles which would not normally find a place in Model Boats magazine. It is an opportunity for Website Members to freely share their  expertise and experience but I am afraid that virtue is its own reward as there is no budget to offer more material recompense!

I look forward to receiving your suggestions.

Colin Bishop - Website Editor